Working to Save Sea Turtles

A recent event in Costa Rica has me reminiscing about my time there. Today El País ran an article about the killing of conservationist Jairo Mora, a Ticowho worked to preserve sea turtles on the Caribbean coast of his country. This sad news highlights the high emotions that surround the preservation of sea turtles.

A baby turtle crawls out to sea.
A baby turtle crawls out to sea.

Some Costa Ricans – and people in other countries – eat sea turtle eggs. They are harvested by digging up the holes where female turtles have laid their eggs. Sometimes the occasional dog will do the same, and it is well known that baby turtles scrambling to sea can be swooped up by a seagull for lunch. Human poaching, however, is much more dangerous to the turtles’ survival than natural causes.

I volunteered through PRETOMA at Ostional, a beach located along the Nicoya Peninsula on Costa Rica’s Pacific coast. I will never forget seeing the giant female turtles waddle up and out of the waves, slowly dig their nests, and drop the large, white eggs into the sand. One of our responsibilities was to count the eggs – a laborious task but nothing compared to the amazing cycle of nature we were watching. Another responsibility was our night patrol, making sure that nests were not being dug up. This was the tricky part, as some community members support conservation efforts, and others do not.

The "arribada" at Playa Ostional.
The “arribada” at Playa Ostional.

A comment from the El País article rang true for me: “Comida para hoy y hambre para mañana…Cuando ya no les quede más playas vírgenes para asfaltar ni árbol por talar, se darán cuenta que el dinero por si sólo no se come.”

Photo credits: costarica.com; fws.org

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Working to Save Sea Turtles

  1. Hi Ali,

    I forwarded your post to Jen Brakeman, an Upper School Biology teacher at HRS. She is taking kids next summer to Costa Rica to work with the sea turtle conservation efforts…

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s